Chamber's Ridge Trail

Chamber’s Ridge is one of many trails in the Goshen Pass area offering beautiful views of the Maury River. This hike gives access to the Maury River Wall and Chamber’s Ridge Climbing areas as well as river access and trail access to other off connecting hikes.

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Description

Cross the swinging bridge and follow the path to the right, Goshen Pass Trail, along the riverbank. A sign on a tree will direct you to Chamber’s Ridge Trail (white blaze) to the left. Chamber’s Ridge Trail is fairly steep but features a small waterfall and flat rocks for resting or picnicking. Once over the top, descend until you see the sign for Hunter’s Trail. Follow it to loop back to the swinging bridge, about a 20-minute walk.


Driving Directions

From the Lexington Visitor Center, drive west on Washington Street to a right onto Main Street (US-11 Business). Continue driving north on US-11 for approximately two miles. Turn left onto VA-39 W/ Maury River Road. You will arrive to Goshen Pass after 11.7 miles. The swinging bridge is approximately 1.7 miles past the picnic wayside. Just past the 55 mph speed limit sign, turn right onto a gravel road. A parking area with a map and informational sign is available.

Tips

  • There are many stinging wasps and bees in wooded areas. For a sting, try to remove the stinger, wash the area with soap and water, apply a cold compress, and apply hydrocortisone cream to stop redness, itching or swelling. If these symptoms persist, take a Benadryl.
  • Goshen Pass is in the Virginia Wildlife Management Area which now requires visitors to have a permit. They can be acquired by calling 1-866-721-6911, emailing CustomerService@dgif.virginia.gov or visiting http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/access-permit.

Insider's Tips

  • Stop by Kind Roots Cafe to pack a picnic lunch to enjoy on the flat rocks along the trail.
  • See the Matthew Fontaine Maury Monument on the left just past the Goshen Pass picnic area (about 685 feet). Often called the “Pathfinder of the Seas,” Maury was an oceanographer, naval officer, and educator at Virginia Military Institute. Upon his death in 1873, his remains were taken through Goshen Pass to their final resting place in Richmond, Virginia.